Information for partners

Whether your partner has erectile dysfunction (ED) or both ED and the signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), here are some ways you can get a better understanding of his condition.

For more detailed information, click on one of the tabs below.

What partners of men with ED should know

You may be thinking, "It's me." But you should know that ED is a real, treatable medical condition that's often caused by another health problem, such as diabetes or heart disease, or by certain medicines. And when the issue goes beyond occasional problems with getting or maintaining an erection, it may be time to act.

Before your partner considers treatment

  • Learn everything you can about ED and the available treatment options, and share that information with your partner. Once both of you have all the facts, your partner can work with his healthcare provider to make a better-informed decision about what to do next
  • Talk with your partner about what's going on and encourage him to see his healthcare provider to learn if he has ED and how treatment can help. Offer to make the appointment for him or to go see his healthcare provider with him. ED is a condition that is treatable
  • Learn about the CIALIS dosing options for ED—find out how CIALIS for daily use (2.5 mg, 5 mg) and 36-hour CIALIS* for use as needed (5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg) differ so that you and your partner can better decide which option may be right for him

*Individual results may vary. Not studied for multiple attempts per dose.

In clinical trials, 36-hour CIALIS taken as needed was shown to improve, up to 36 hours after dosing, the ability of men with ED to have a single successful intercourse attempt.

Make a list of medicines for your partner's doctor visit

Suggest that your partner make a list of all prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements he is taking, as complications may result when used in combination with certain drugs, including both CIALIS dosing options. Specifically, your partner should let his doctor or healthcare provider know if he takes any of the following*:

  • Medicines called nitrates, Nitrates are commonly used to treat chest pain, which is a symptom of heart disease. Nitrates can be found in medicines such as isosorbide dinitrate or isosorbide mononitrate. Some recreational drugs called “poppers” also contain nitrates, such as amyl nitrite and butyl nitrite. Your partner should not take CIALIS if he takes nitrates, because the combination can cause a sudden, unsafe drop in blood pressure
  • Medicines called alpha-blockers. Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate problems or high blood pressure. If CIALIS is taken with certain alpha-blockers, your partner's blood pressure could suddenly drop, causing him to get dizzy or faint. These include Hytrin® (terazosin HCl), Flomax® (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura® (doxazosin mesylate), Minipress® (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral® (alfuzosin HCl), Jalyn® (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), and Rapaflo® (silodosin)
  • Other medicines used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Medicines called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir®) or lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra®)
  • Some types of oral antifungals, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral®), or itraconazole (Sporanox®)
  • Some types of antibiotics, such as clarithromycin (Biaxin®), telithromycin (Ketek®), and erythromycin (several brand names exist; please consult your partner's healthcare provider to determine if he is taking this medicine)
  • Other medicines or treatments for ED
  • CIALIS is also marketed as ADCIRCA® (tadalafil) for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Your partner should not take both CIALIS and ADCIRCA, nor should your partner take sildenafil citrate (Revatio®) with CIALIS

*The brands listed are trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Eli Lilly and Company. The makers of these brands are not affiliated with and do not endorse Eli Lilly and Company or its products.

If your partner has been prescribed CIALIS (2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg) for ED

  • Make sure your partner takes CIALIS as directed by his healthcare provider
    • CIALIS for daily use (2.5 mg, 5 mg) should be taken once a day, around the same time every day
    • 36-hour CIALIS for use as needed (5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg) should be taken at least 30 minutes before sexual activity.* Everyone is different. Your partner may need to take CIALIS an hour before sexual activity
    • Your partner should not take CIALIS more than one time each day
  • Remind your partner that it may take CIALIS some time before it begins to work
    • Your partner may need to take CIALIS more than once before he sees results. If he takes 36-hour CIALIS for use as needed for ED a few times and still isn't satisfied, he should talk with his healthcare provider, as his dose may need to be adjusted
    • If your partner is taking CIALIS for daily use for ED, it may take up to 4 to 5 days before it may start to work and he is able to have successful intercourse
    • CIALIS will not cause your partner to have an erection unless he is sexually stimulated
    • If your partner isn't satisfied with the results, encourage him to share these results with his doctor. The doctor may adjust his dose, depending on how his body responds to the medicine

*Individual results may vary. Not studied for multiple attempts per dose.

In clinical trials, 36-hour CIALIS started to work in 30 minutes for some men who took 20 mg of 36-hour CIALIS. When taken as needed, 36-hour CIALIS was shown to improve, up to 36 hours after dosing, the ability of men with ED to have a single successful intercourse attempt.

Understand how CIALIS (2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg) can help and what it can't do

It's important to remember that CIALIS will not cure ED, increase your partner's sexual desire, protect you or your partner against sexually transmitted diseases, or act as male birth control.

Both CIALIS dosing options for ED, when taken as directed by a healthcare provider, can help with erections. In clinical trials, they improved men's:

  • Satisfaction with the hardness of erections
  • Satisfaction with sexual intercourse

It's important to remember that CIALIS can only help your partner get an erection sufficient for sexual activity when he is sexually stimulated. CIALIS should not give him a spontaneous erection. Also keep in mind that CIALIS may not start to work right away. If your partner keeps trying and still isn't satisfied with the results, have him check in with his doctor, who may recommend an adjustment to your partner's CIALIS dosage.

What partners of men with ED and the signs and symptoms of BPH should know

You may be wondering why your partner has to urinate frequently and urgently many times during the day. Or even after going to the bathroom, he needs to go again soon. Just like ED, these common symptoms of BPH may be caused by a medical issue.

Before your partner considers treatment

  • Learn everything you can about ED and the available treatment options, and share that information with your partner. Once both of you have all the facts, your partner can work with his healthcare provider to make a better-informed decision about what to do next
  • Learn everything you can about BPH, also known as an enlarged prostate, including its causes, symptoms, and the treatment options available. Together, you can work with his healthcare provider to decide what is the best course of action to take
  • Talk with your partner about what's going on and encourage him to see his healthcare provider to learn if he has ED and the signs and symptoms of BPH, and how treatment can help. Offer to make the appointment for him or to go see his healthcare provider with him. ED and BPH symptoms are treatable

Make a list of all medicines for your partner's doctor visit

Suggest that your partner make a list of all prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements he is taking, as complications may result when used in combination with certain drugs, including CIALIS. Specifically, your partner should let his doctor or healthcare provider know if he takes any of the following*:

  • Medicines called nitrates. Nitrates are commonly used to treat chest pain, which is a symptom of heart disease. Nitrates can be found in medicines such as isosorbide dinitrate or isosorbide mononitrate. Some recreational drugs called “poppers” also contain nitrates, such as amyl nitrite and butyl nitrite. Your partner should not take CIALIS if he takes nitrates, because the combination can cause a sudden, unsafe drop in blood pressure
  • Medicines called alpha-blockers. Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate problems or high blood pressure. If CIALIS is taken with certain alpha-blockers, your partner's blood pressure could suddenly drop, causing him to get dizzy or faint. These include Hytrin® (terazosin HCl), Flomax® (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura® (doxazosin mesylate), Minipress® (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral® (alfuzosin HCl), Jalyn® (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), and Rapaflo® (silodosin)
  • Other medicines used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Medicines called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir®) or lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra®)
  • Some types of oral antifungals, such as ketoconazole (Nizoral®) or itraconazole (Sporanox®)
  • Some types of antibiotics, such as clarithromycin (Biaxin®), telithromycin (Ketek®), and erythromycin (several brand names exist; please consult your partner's healthcare provider to determine if he is taking this medicine)
  • Other medicines or treatments for ED
  • CIALIS is also marketed as ADCIRCA® (tadalafil) for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Your partner should not take both CIALIS and ADCIRCA, nor should your partner take sildenafil citrate (Revatio®) with CIALIS

*The brands listed are trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Eli Lilly and Company. The makers of these brands are not affiliated with and do not endorse Eli Lilly and Company or its products.

If your partner has been prescribed CIALIS for daily use (5 mg) for both ED and the signs and symptoms of BPH

  • Make sure your partner takes CIALIS for daily use (5 mg) as directed by his healthcare provider. CIALIS for daily use should be taken once a day, around the same time every day. Your partner should not take CIALIS more than one time each day
  • Remind your partner that it may take some time before CIALIS begins to work. If your partner keeps trying and still isn't satisfied with the results, have him speak with his doctor or healthcare provider
  • For ED, it may take up to 4 to 5 days before it may start to work
  • CIALIS for daily use (5 mg) can help improve the symptoms of BPH as early as 2 weeks after beginning treatment, although it may take as long as 4 weeks to see an improvement
  • You should also know that CIALIS will not cause your partner to have an erection unless he is sexually stimulated

Understand how CIALIS for daily use (5 mg) can help and what it can't do

CIALIS for daily use (5 mg) is the only CIALIS dosing option indicated to treat the signs and symptoms of BPH or both ED and the signs and symptoms of BPH. The recommended starting dose of CIALIS for daily use for the treatment of ED is 2.5 mg.

It's important to remember that CIALIS will not cure ED, increase your partner's sexual desire, protect you or your partner against sexually transmitted diseases, or act as male birth control.

It's also important to remember that CIALIS can only help your partner get an erection sufficient for sexual activity when he is sexually stimulated. CIALIS should not give him a spontaneous erection.

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