Talking to your doctor or healthcare provider about erectile dysfunction (ED) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)

It may not be easy for you to talk to your doctor or healthcare provider about certain issues. But the more information you are able to share about yourself, the easier it will be for your doctor to properly diagnose your condition. In the sections below, you'll find tools and resources that can help you start a discussion with your doctor about ED and BPH.

Download the Doctor Discussion Guides

Stick to the facts

Share your medical history

Report all the medicines you take

Download the Doctor Discussion Guides

Whether you have ED, or ED and the signs and symptoms of BPH, your healthcare provider needs to know what you are experiencing. Here's a way to organize your thoughts for the conversation with your doctor.

From the tabs below, select the types of questions you want to discuss with your healthcare provider. Click the button to download the questions to your computer. You can print and fill out your questionnaire before your next doctor's appointment to help start the discussion.

No identifiable personal information will be saved or stored concerning your responses.

Questions about ED - Download PDF
Questions about the signs and symptoms of BPH - Download PDF

Talking about ED

The main problem I am having is:
___ Getting an erection
___ Keeping an erection
___ The firmness of erections

I started to notice a change:
___ Less than 1 month ago
___ 1 to 2 months ago
___ 2 to 6 months ago
___ 6 months to 1 year ago
___ More than 1 year ago

The change was:
___ Gradual
___ Sudden

The problem happens:
___ Rarely
___ Sometimes
___ Frequently
___ Almost always

About my erections:
___ I have been able to get and keep erections in the past
___ I have erections when I sleep
___ I have erections early in the morning

To help you start the discussion with your doctor, print this guide, fill it out, and bring it to your next appointment. Only your healthcare provider can determine which treatment may be right for you. Remember, the information you print may be sensitive.

Talking about the signs and symptoms of BPH*

About my urination problems over the past month:
___ I have experienced a frequent or urgent need to urinate
___ After urinating, I have the sensation of not emptying my
___ bladder completely
___ I have a weak urine stream or a stream that stops and starts
___ I feel the need to push or strain during urination
___ I urinate frequently at night

I started to notice a change:
___ Less than 1 month ago
___ 1 to 2 months ago
___ 2 to 6 months ago
___ 6 months to 1 year ago
___ More than 1 year ago

The problem happens:
___ Rarely
___ Sometimes
___ Frequently
___ Almost always

* Treatment of individual symptoms may vary.

To help you start the discussion with your doctor, print this guide, fill it out, and bring it to your next appointment. Only your healthcare provider can determine which treatment may be right for you. Remember, the information you print may be sensitive.

 

Stick to the facts

Even if you've already tried other ED treatments, talking to your doctor is the key to getting the treatment you need for your ED.

You may feel uncomfortable if your doctor or healthcare provider asks you some personal questions. Just remember that these questions are meant to help your doctor diagnose your problem and prescribe the right treatment for it. It's important to be open and honest with your healthcare provider so he or she can help determine the best treatment option for you.

Be open and honest in your conversation. Let your healthcare provider know when you first started experiencing ED, and be sure to mention any treatments or medications that you have tried or are currently taking.

Share your medical history

If your doctor thinks you have ED, it's important to give your medical history to him or her. Ask your healthcare provider if your heart is healthy enough for you to have sexual activity. You should not take CIALIS if your healthcare provider has told you not to have sexual activity because of your health problems. Before taking CIALIS, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical problems, particularly if you have or ever had:

  • Heart problems such as chest pain (angina), heart failure, irregular heartbeats, or a heart attack
  • High or low blood pressure or high blood pressure that is not controlled
  • Stroke
  • Liver problems or kidney problems, or require dialysis
  • Retinitis pigmentosa, a rare genetic (runs in families) eye disease
  • Severe vision loss, including a condition called NAION
  • Stomach ulcers
  • A bleeding problem
  • A deformed penis shape or Peyronie's disease
  • An erection that lasted more than 4 hours
  • Blood cell problems such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia

Report all the medicines you take

It’s very important to tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. CIALIS and other medicines may affect each other. Always check with your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medicines. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following*:

  • Medicines called nitrates. Nitrates are commonly used to treat chest pain, which is a symptom of heart disease. Do not take CIALIS if you take nitrates such as isosorbide dinitrate or isosorbide mononitrate, or if you use recreational drugs called "poppers" such as amyl nitrite or butyl nitrite, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure
  • Medicines called alpha-blockers. Alpha-blockers are sometimes prescribed for prostate problems or high blood pressure. If CIALIS is taken with certain alpha-blockers, your blood pressure could suddenly drop, causing you to get dizzy or faint. These include Hytrin® (terazosin HCl), Flomax® (tamsulosin HCl), Cardura® (doxazosin mesylate), Minipress® (prazosin HCl), Uroxatral® (alfuzosin HCl), Jalyn® (dutasteride and tamsulosin HCl), and Rapaflo® (silodosin)
  • Other medicines used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Medicines called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors, such as ritonavir (Norvir®) or lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra®)
  • Some types of oral antifungals such as ketoconazole (Nizoral®) or itraconazole (Sporanox®)
  • Some types of antibiotics such as clarithromycin (Biaxin®), telithromycin (Ketek®), and erythromycin (several brand names exist; please consult your healthcare provider to determine if you are taking this medicine)
  • Other medicines or treatments for ED
  • CIALIS is also marketed as ADCIRCA® (tadalafil) for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. You should not take both CIALIS and ADCIRCA, nor should you take sildenafil citrate (Revatio®) with CIALIS

And before you take CIALIS, be sure to ask your healthcare provider if your heart is healthy enough for you to have sexual activity. You should not take CIALIS if your healthcare provider has told you not to have sexual activity because of your health problems. Please see full Patient Information.

*The brands listed are trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Eli Lilly and Company. The makers of these brands are not affiliated with and do not endorse Eli Lilly and Company or its products.